Terrestrial Resources GIS Data

The Fish and Wildlife Research Institute serves a variety of terrestrial related data through our Terrestrial Resources Geographic Information System (TRGIS) Internet Map Server (IMS). This page provides a short description of each layer with links to Federal Geographic Data Clearinghouse (FGDC) compliant metadata and zipped files for download. The datum for all files is NAD83, using a customized Albers projection, in meters.

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The zipped shapefiles provided below can be uncompressed using shareware programs Winzip or IZArc. ArcExplorer, a lightweight GIS data viewer, can be used to view these shapefiles. A free copy of ArcExplorer may be downloaded from the ESRI Web site.

Many GIS data layers from the Center For Spatial Analysis have been converted to Google Earth files for easy viewing within the free Google Earth viewer. Google Earth requires an Internet connection. In order to view these files, you must have Google Earth installed on the computer you are using. If you do not have Google Earth, you can download it from the Google Earth web site. Google Earth requires an Internet connection, so if you do not have one, you will not be able to view these files. If you do and Google Earth is installed on your computer, you can simply click on the highlighted links below and choose "open" or "save" when you are prompted.

See the FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute's "Quick Maps" page for additional zipped KMLs.


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Wildlife

Species Locations


Bog Frog
Collection of known Bog Frog locations compiled for the FWC Wildlife Habitat Conservation Needs report

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~10KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Black Bear Nuisance Reports
This shapefile contains the locations of calls from the public regarding human- black bear interactions in the state of Florida.  This dataset limits human-bear interaction to only those which are where the bears were observed at the location or in the area of the caller.  Only those records that a geographic coordinate can be obtained from the black bear database maintained by the FWC are included in this shapefile.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Black Bear Roadkill
This dataset contains the locations of Florida black bear (Ursus americanus floridanus) roadkills within the state of Florida. In this shapefile, we used only those records maintained by the FWC from which we could obtain a geographic coordinate.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Black Bear Telemetry
This shapefile contains telemetry data collected by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission from various black bear populations and various years.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~1MB.

Breeding Bird Atlas
The Breeding Bird Atlas project was a collaborative effort of Audubon of Florida, the Florida Ornithological Society, and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. More than 1,880 participants, most of them volunteers, were involved in conducting surveys and compiling data.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped geodatabase ~73MB.
Download the North Central Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Northeast Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Northwest Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the South Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Southwest Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.

Florida Eagle Nesting
Known bald eagle nesting territories within the state of Florida were surveyed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) during the 2013 nesting season with fixed-wing or rotary-wing aircraft beginning in late November 2012 and extending through mid-April 2013. Nest locations were determined with the use of aircraft-based Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Accuracy of locations is estimated to be within 0.1 miles of the true location. Yearly nest activity status is listed for the 1998 through 2013 nesting seasons.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~234KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Flatwoods Salamander - 2001 to 2005
Positive identification of Flatwoods Salamanders from a 4 year FWC survey of ponds (2001-2005) through the range of Flatwoods Salamanders in Florida

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~10KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Gopher Tortoise Relocation Permit Recipient Sites
This dataset is a point representation of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Gopher Tortoise standard tortoise relocation permit recipient sites.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Panther Mortality
The Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) mortality database contains all known and documented mortalities including known or likely causes.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~35KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Panther Telemetry
These data were collected by three entities:  the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Everglades National Park (ENP), and Big Cypress National Preserve (BCNP) and represent VHS radio-telemetry data collected since the early 1980's.  Methodology for the collection of telemetry locations was previously described by Belden et al. (1988).  Spatial accuracy of telemetry data has been estimated to be within 230 m (Belden et al., 1988; Dees et al. 2001).  In addition, the methodology used to acquire telemetry locations likely resulted in most locations being determined when individuals were at daytime resting sites (i.e. locations were usually determined during early to mid-morning [Comiskey et al., 2002; Beier et al., 2003]).

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~3MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 01-09 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 10-19 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 20-29 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 30-39 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 40-49 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 50-59 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 60-69 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 70-79 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 80-89 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 90-99 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 100-109 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 110-119 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 120-129 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 130-139 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 140-149 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 150-159 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 160-169 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 170-179 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 180-189 zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID 190-plus zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry - FL - ID TX zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Panther Telemetry-GPS - FL zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Pine Barrens Treefrog
All known Pine Barrens Treefrog locations digitized from paper maps maintained by Paul Moler of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~13KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Red Cockaded Woodpecker
This shapefile contains location information on the Red Cockaded Woodpecker collected by various state and federal agencies including the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. There is no attribute data for these RCW locations. Data were compiled by requesting information from a variety of federal, state, and local biologists, RCW researchers, and area managers who provided the information they had on hand. None of the data were collected in any standardized format nor under any certain protocol. Similar data, e.g., date recorded, location accuracy level, active/inactive status, were not collected or maintained between sites. The data set includes locations of active and inactive nest trees and centroids of cluster locations. The best description of those data would be as general locations of where RCWs have previously occurred. We urge caution against their use as definitive representation of RCW occurrence.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~126KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Reptile Regions
This GIS data set comprises a portion of the Gulf-Wide Information System (G-WIS) database for the entire coastal zone of Florida and the lower St. Johns River. These data characterize coastal environments and wildlife resources for environmental planning and natural resource management purposes. The G-WIS data include three main components: Shoreline habitats, sensitive biological resources, and human-use resources. This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reptiles (GT-polygon)

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~12MB.
Download the American Crocodile zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Atlantic Salt Marsh Snake zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Eastern Indigo Snake zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Florida Gopher Frog zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Florida Pine Snake zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Florida Scrub Lizard zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Gopher Tortoise zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Green Sea Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file ~9MB.
Download the Hawksbill Sea Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file ~1MB.
Download the Kemps Ridley Sea Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file ~8MB.
Download the Leatherback Sea Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file ~3MB.
Download the Loggerhead Sea Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file ~9MB.
Download the Mangrove Terrapin zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.
Download the Spotted Turtle zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Sand Skink
All known Sand Skink locations digitized from paper maps maintained by Paul Moler of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~9KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Scrub Jay - 1992 to 1993
This shapefile plots the locaitons of all Florida Scrub-Jays in 1992-1993 including the size (numbers) of individual families wherever possible. Participants in this project revistited known Florida Scrub-Jay localities to determine their current status; searched new, previously unsurveyed scrub patches for the presence of Florida Scrub-Jays; and compiled and attempted to confirm all existing information on recent Florida Scrub-Jay localities. Information was compiled from reliable , published or unpublished Florida Scrub-Jay surveys.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~146KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Turtle Stranding
Coordinated by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission - Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI), the Florida Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network (STSSN) is responsible for gathering standardized data on stranded marine turtles throughout the state. The Florida STSSN functions as a part of an eighteen state network led by NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). In Florida, strandings are documented by FWRI staff biologists and by a network of permitted participants located around the state. Live strandings are rescued and transported to properly permitted rehabilitation facilities. Data from strandings are collected on a standardized reporting form and include date, species, location, carapace length and width, carcass condition, carcass disposition, and information on anomalies (e.g., entanglement, propeller damage, fibropapillomas). Additionally, certain carcasses are regularly collected by FWRI staff for gross or detailed necropsy. Each week, FWRI reports Florida strandings to NMFS as a part of a management plan that is intended to reduce the incidental take of turtles in the shrimp fishery. FWRI also generates monthly and yearly stranding summary reports to monitor mortality and to detect and describe any unusual stranding events. Stranding data collected through the Florida STSSN have been used extensively in the identification of mortality factors and in the development of recovery actions (e.g., Turtle Excluder Device (TED) requirements, gill net regulations).

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1.3MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.

Turtle Nesting Beaches
The State of Florida, through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Florida Marine Research Institute, coordinates the Statewide Nesting Beach Survey program (SNBS). The SNBS was initiated in 1979 under a cooperative agreement between FWC (then DNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Its purpose is to document the total distribution, seasonality, and abundance of nesting by sea turtles in Florida. Three species of sea turtles, the loggerhead (Caretta caretta), the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), and the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), nest regularly on Florida's beaches. All the species are listed as either Threatened or Endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Survey data are derived from observations of tracks and other nesting signs left on the beach by sea turtles. Species identifications and determinations of nesting or non-nesting emergences are based on the evaluation of features of the track and the nest. Data are gathered through a network of permit holders consisting of private conservation groups, volunteers, consultants, academics, local governments, federal agencies, and the Florida Park Service. Results are used by managers to evaluate and minimize impacts to turtles and their nests due to human activities such as coastal construction, beach renourishment, and recreation, as well as to identify important areas for enhanced protection or land acquisition.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~170KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Snowy Plover Nests - 2002 to 2006
Snowy plover nest site locations collected from a 2002-2006 FWC snowy plover status and distribution study. The FWC initiated its snowy plover survey project to (1) reassess the population size and distribution of snowy plovers breeding in Florida, (2) assess the population size and distribution of snowy plovers wintering in Florida, (3) assess productivity of snowy plovers nesting on Florida beaches, and (4) conduct a review of the literature on the Cuban snowy plover.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~21KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Striped Newt
Positive identification of Striped Newts from two sources: (1) Means, D. B., and R. C. Means. 1998. Distribution of the striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus) and gopher frog (Rana capito) in Munson sand hills of the Florida panhandle. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. (2) Johnson, S. A., and R. D. Owen. 2005. Status of historical striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus) locations in peninsular Florida and some "new" locations. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tallahassee, Florida, USA.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~9KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Wading Bird Rookeries - 1999
This shapefile contains a range map of wading bird rookeries located in 1999 by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission conducted a statewide aerial survey during 26 January-25 June 1999 to locate waterbird (herons, egrets, ibises, spoonbills, storks, anhingas, cormorants, and pelicans) breeding colonies and estimate colony size and species composition. Fixed-wing aircraft were used to fly statewide East-West survey transects at 5-km intervals. Survey routes deviated at times to allow inventory of previously known colonies from earlier surveys. This database contains records for all known and verified colonies in the state of Florida that were surveyed by the FWC during the period 1999 nesting season. Nests discovered more recently than this are not included in the database. Each year, a number of new colony sites are found. For this reason, users of this database are cautioned that the absence of a colony record for a given property does not necessarily mean wading birds are not present. This colony locator service is not meant to replace a specific on-the-ground survey. Disturbance to the colony may occur if a visit is made, and many of the colonies are located on private land. Providing these locations does not confer any permission by FWC to access private property.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~86KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

FWC Wildlife Observations
This is a point shapefile created from the qryLipExport2 query of the FWC WildObs database. The WildObs database provides a standardized format for recording and managing incidental, casual, or short-term systematic observations of wildlife. Various information on geographic location, species (number, age, sex, etc.), habitat and activities can be recorded on wildlife observation forms using Microsoft Access 2000. Suggested target species and groups vary with the seasons. This system is defined to be useful to biologists to maintain species lists or to track wildlife populations in protected or managed areas. The Nongame Wildlife program is interested in maintaining current records of species distributions within Florida. This database is used as a repository for both data from planned surveys, contracted projects, and casual observations. The manual, available from the contact, provides details of each table and field of the database structure as well as overview of the contents. All data included in the database is recorded as points.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~178KB.
Download the NE Florida Observations zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the NC Florida Observations zipped KML Google Earth file ~1MB.
Download the NW Florida Observations zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the SW Florida Observations zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the S Florida Observations zipped KML Google Earth file ~1MB.


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Habitat and Range Maps


Scrub Jay Habitat - 1992 to 1993
This shapefile contains a Florida Scrub-Jay species-wide distribution map which plots the locaion of all Florida Scrub-Jay populations adn their occuped habitat still extant as of 1992-1993 as well as identifies tracts of apparently suitable or restorable habitat that were not occupied by Florida Scrub-Jays in 1992-1993.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Florida Black Bear Range
This shapefile contains a range map of the Florida Black Bear created in 2004 and updated in 2005, 2007, and 2008. The range map was created by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~345KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Panther Habitat Zones
Panther habitat zones were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's panther subteam of Multi-Species/Ecosystem Recovery Implementation Team (MERIT). Members of the MERIT panther recovery subteam identified lands essential to the long-term survival of the Florida panther. The MERIT subteam defined the Primary Zone as "all lands essential for the survival of the Florida panther in the wild." A Secondary Zone includes "lands contiguous with the Primary Zone, and areas which panthers may currently use, and where expansion of the Florida panther population is most likely to occur". Lastly, a Dispersal Zone was identified as an area needed for panthers to disperse north of the Caloosahatchee River.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~76KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Panther Habitat Preservation Plan
The Florida Panther Interagency Committee (FPIC), comprised of the FWS, NPS, GFC, and DEP, was established in 1986 to coordinate recovery of the Florida panther. A Habitat Preservation Plan (HPP), prepared in 1993 for the FPIC, identified 374,868 ha of occupied and potential habitat considered essential to maintaining a minimum viable population of 50 breeding adult panthers in South Florida. These data represent Priority 1 and Priority 2 areas identified by the FPIC

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~47KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.


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Strategic Habitat Conservation Areas (grids)


Strategic Habitat Conservation Areas (SHCA), serve as a foundation for conservation planning in Florida and depict the need for species protection through habitat conservation.

More information can be found in Wildlife Habitat Conservation Needs in Florida: Updated Recommendations for Strategic Habitat Conservation Areas.


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Wildlife Habitat Ranking System

Go to the current Wildlife Habitat Ranking System site.


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Land Use and Land Cover

Florida Forever
FLORIDA FOREVER BOT PROJECTS (layer name FFBOT): This is a polygon data layer for Florida Forever Board of Trustees (BOT) projects (formerly known as CARL projects). This data layer is site-based and contains boundaries of all Florida Forever BOT projects approved by the State's Acquisition and Restoration Council as of 14 August 2009. These lands have been proposed for acquisition because of outstanding natural resources, opportunity for natural resource-based recreation, or historical and archaeological resources. However, these areas may not be currently managed for their resource value. Portions of these projects may have already been acquired by the State and/or its acquisition partners.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~4MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~5MB.


Agriculture


Agriculture - Citrus Grove
This GIS data set represents the citrus habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~4MB.

Agriculture - Row Field Crops
This GIS data set represents the row/field crops habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida. Row crops are agricultural fields in which rows remain well defined even after crops have been harvested. Typical row crops in Florida include corn, tomatoes, potatoes, cotton, and beans. Field crops are agricultural croplands not planted in rows. Typical field crops in Florida include hay and grasses.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~8.76GB.

Agriculture - Sugar Cane
This GIS data set represents the sugar cane habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1.48MB.

Agriculture - Other
This GIS data set represents the other agriculture habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida. Agricultural lands other than pasture land, sugar cane fields, citrus groves, and croplands. Types of agricultural lands included in this category are peach orchards, pecan and avocado groves, nurseries and vineyards, specialty farms, aquaculture, fallow cropland, and unidentified agricultural uses.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2.35MB.


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Beach and Surf Zones


Mangrove - poly
These dense, brackish water swamps occur along low-energy shorelines and in protected, tidally influenced bays of southern Florida. This community is composed of freeze-intolerant tree species that are distributed south of a line from Cedar Key on the Gulf coast to St. Augustine on the Atlantic coast. These swamp communities are usually dominated by red, black, and white mangroves that progress in a sere from seaward to landward areas, respectively, while buttonwood trees occur in areas above high tide. Openings and transitional areas in mangrove swamps sometimes contain glasswort, saltwort, and other salt marsh species. All three major species of mangroves are mapped as a single class with no effort made to differentiate these species into separate zones.

View the full Metadata report. Download the Zipped Shapefile ~29.3MB.
Download the Mangroves - Florida Atlantic zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Mangroves - Florida Keys zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.
Download the Mangroves - Florida Southwest zipped KML Google Earth file ~17MB.
Download the Mangroves - Florida Gulf zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.

Mangrove - arc
This GIS data set represents mangroves in the coastal areas of Florida as mapped in the September 2003 delivery of Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) shoreline classification arcs. This GIS data set was reselected from the shoreline classification based on the MANGROVE attribute equal to "Y" (yes). Research Planning Inc. (RPI) developed the ESI classification arcs based on the 1994-1995 land use and land cover for all of Florida's water management districts, with the exception of the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), which was classified based on 1999 DOQQs. At FMRI's request, RPI also reworked some shoreline in the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), which had poor positional accuracy.

View the full Metadata report. Download the Zipped Shapefile ~15MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~17MB.

Coastal Strand
Coastal strand occurs on well-drained sandy soils and typically includes the zoned vegetation of the upper beach, nearby dunes, or on coastal rock formations. This community generally occurs in a long, narrow band parallel to the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico, and along the shores of some saline bays or sounds in both north and south Florida. This community occupies areas formed along high-energy shorelines, and is strongly affected by wind, waves, and salt spray. Vegetation within this community typically consists of low growing vines, grasses, and herbaceous plants with very few small trees or large shrubs. Pioneer or early successional herbaceous vegetation characterizes the foredune and upper beach, while a gradual change to woody plant species occurs in more protected areas landward. Typical plant species include beach morning glory, railroad vine, sea oats, saw palmetto, Spanish bayonet, yaupon holly, wax myrtle, along with sea grape, cocoplum, and other tropicals in southern Florida. The coastal strand community only includes the zone of early successional vegetation that lies between the upper beach, and more highly developed communities landward. Adjacent or contiguous community types such as xeric oak scrubs, pinelands, or hardwood forests would therefore be classified and mapped accordingly.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~460KB.

Sand Beaches
This GIS data set represents the sand/beach habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the Zipped Shapefile <1MB.

Tidal Flats
This GIS data set represents the tidal flat habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). Tidal flats are areas composed of that portion of the shore environment protected from wave action and primarily composed of muds transported by tidal channels.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~334KB.
Download the Florida Atlantic zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the South Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~8MB.
Download the Tampa Bay zipped KML Google Earth file ~9MB.
Download the Panhandle zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.


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Disturbed or Transitional


Bare Soil and Clearcut
Areas of bare soil representing recent timber cutting operations, areas devoid of vegetation as a consequence of recent fires, natural areas of exposed bare soil (e.g., sandy areas within xeric communities), or bare soil exposed due to vegetation removal for unknown reasons.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~33.2MB.

Shrub Brushland
This association includes a variety of situations where natural upland community types have been recently disturbed through clear-cutting commercial pinelands, land clearing, or fire, and are recovering through natural successional processes. This type could be characterized as an early condition of old-field succession, and various shrubs, tree saplings, and lesser amounts of grasses and herbs dominate the community. Common species include wax myrtle, saltbush, sumac, elderberry, saw palmetto, blackberry, gallberry, fetterbush, staggerbush, broomsedge, dog fennel, together with oak, pine and other tree seedlings or saplings.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~85.8MB.


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Exotic Plants


Australian Pine
This GIS data set represents the Australian pine habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida. This habitat type is represented by sites known to be dominated by Australian pine through field inspection.

View the full Metadata report. Download the Zipped Shapefile ~11KB.

Brazilian Pepper
This GIS data set represents the Brazilian pepper habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida. Sites known to be dominated by Brazilian pepper through field inspection.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~13KB.

Melaleuca
This GIS data set represents the melaleuca habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida. Sites known to be dominated by melaleuca through field inspection.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~10KB.

Exotics - Other
This GIS data set represents the exotic plants habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2MB.


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Forest


Bottomland Hardwood Forests
These wetland forests are composed of a diverse assortment of hydric hardwoods which occur on the rich alluvial soils of silt and clay deposited along several Pandhandle rivers including the Apalachicola, Choctawhatchee, and Escambia. These communities are characterized by an overstory that includes water hickory, overcup oak, swamp chestnut oak, river birch, American sycamore, red maple, Florida elm, bald cypress, blue beech, and swamp ash .

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~916KB.

Hardwood Hammock Forests
This hardwood hammock and forest class includes the major upland hardwood associations that occur statewide on fairly rich sandy soils. Variations in species composition, and the local or spatial distributions of these communities are due in part to differences in soil moisture regimes, soil type, and geographic location within the state. Mesic and xeric variations are included within this association. The mesic hammock community represents the climax vegetation type within many areas of northern and central Florida. Characteristic species in the extreme north include American beech, southern magnolia, Shumard oak, white oak, mockernut hickory, pignut hickory, sourgum, basswood, white ash, mulberry, and spruce pine. Mesic hammocks of the peninsula are less diverse due to the absence of hardwood species that are adapted to more northerly climates, and are characterized by laurel oak, hop hornbeam, blue beech, sweetgum, cabbage palm, American holly, and southern magnolia. Xeric hammocks occur on deep, well-drained, sandy soils where fire has been absent for long periods of time. These open, dry hammocks contain live oak, sand-live oak, bluejack oak, blackjack oak, southern red oak, sand-post oak, and pignut hickory

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~49.6MB.

Mixed Hardwood - Pine Forests
This mixed pine-hardwood forest community is the southern extension of the Piedmont southern mixed hardwoods, and occurs mainly on the clay soils on the northern Pandhandle. Younger stands may be predominantly pines, while a complex of various hardwoods become co-dominants as the system matures over time through plant succession. The overstory consists of shortleaf and loblolly pine, American beech, mockernut hickory, southern red oak, water oak, American holly, and dogwood. Also included in this category are other upland forests that occur statewide and contain a mixture of conifers and hardwoods as the co-dominant overstory component. These communities contain longleaf pine, slash pine, and loblolly pine in mixed association with live oak, laurel oak, and water oak, together with other hardwood species characteristic of the upland hardwood hammocks and forests class.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~62.9MB.

Mixed Wetland and Forests
This category includes mixed wetland forest communities in which neither hardwoods nor conifers achieve dominance. The mix can include hardwoods with pine or cypress and can represent a mixed hydric site or a transition between hardwoods and conifers on hydric/mesic sites.

View the full Metadata Download the zipped shapefile ~73MB.

Natural Pinelands
This data set was originally part of a raster data set called "terr_sub" used in the CWCS Strategy. "Terr_sub" was reclassified from the 2003 Landcover data set.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~104.3MB.

Commercial Pinelands
This class represents a subset of the Pinelands class in the FWC 2003 Florida Vegetation and Land Cover. Areas identified as Tree Plantations on private lands (using the Water Managmement Districts Land Use Land Cover data) were removed from the Pineland class of the FWC 2003 data and classified as Indusrial/Commercial Pinelands.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~29.3MB.

Pine and Rocklands
This class represents a subset of the Pinelands class in the FWC 2003 Florida Vegetation and Land Cover. This data set was originally part of a raster data set called "terr_sub" used in the CWCS Strategy. "Terr_sub" was reclassified from the 2003 Landcover data set. Areas of Pinelands, Hardwood Hammock and Forest and Mixed Hardwood-Pine Forest found within 1,000 meters of an identified pine rockland or rockland hammock (Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Element Occurrence data) or remaniing areas of pine rockland as identified in Cox et al. (1994). Pine Rockland is a unique type of pine flatwoods that is found exclusively on limestone substrate in the Florida Keys, the Big Cypress Swamp, and the Miami Rock Ridge (the limestone outcropping that rises from the Everglades to heights of 23 feet (7 m) above sea level). The overstory of Pine Rockland habitat contains a single canopy species, South Florida slash pine. The dominant pines tower over a savanna-like understory of saw palmettos, locust berry, willow bustic, beauty berry, broom grasses, silver palms, and a rich herbaceous layer. This community is often associated with rockland hammock and other short-hydroperiod freshwater wetland communities. These sub-tropical pine trees and understory plants have adapted to seasonal wildfires and the lack of soil on the exposed limerock. Pine Rockland communities are globally imperiled and support federal and state listed plant species, such as deltoid spurge and Small?s milkwort which only occur in this habitat.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB.


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Prairie and Grassland


Cattail Marsh
Freshwater marsh habitat areas dominated by cattails.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1.5MB.

Dry Prairie
Dry prairies are large native grass and shrublands occurring on very flat terrain interspersed with scattered cypress domes and strands, bayheads, isolated freshwater marshes, and hardwood hammocks. This community is characterized by many species of grasses, sedges, herbs, and shrubs, including saw palmetto, fetterbush, staggerbush, tar flower, gallberry, blueberry, wiregrass, carpet grasses, and various bluestems. The largest areas of these treeless plains historically occurred just north of Lake Okeechobee, and they were subject to annual or frequent fires. Many of these areas have been converted to improved pasture. In central and south Florida, palmetto prairies, which consist of former pine flatwoods where the overstory trees have been thinned or removed, are also included in this category. These sites contain highly scattered pines that cover less than 10 to 15 percent of an area.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~44.6MB.

Freshwater Marsh and Wet Prairie
These freshwater marsh and wet prairie wetland communities are dominated by a wide assortment of herbaceous plant species growing on sand, clay, marl, and organic soils in areas of variable water depths and inundation regimes. Generally, freshwater marshes occur in deeper, more strongly inundated situations and are characterized by tall emergents and floating-leaved species. Freshwater marshes occur within flatwoods depressions, along broad, shallow lake and river shorelines, and scattered in open areas within hardwood and cypress swamps. Also, other portions of freshwater lakes, rivers, and canals that are dominated by floating-leaved plants such as lotus, spatterdock, duck weed, and water hyancinths are included in this category. Wet prairies commonly occur in shallow, periodically inundated areas and are usually dominated by aquatic grasses, sedges, and their associates. Wet prairies occur as scattered, shallow depressions within dry prairie areas and on marl prairie areas in south Florida. Also included in this category are areas in Southwest Florida with scattered dwarf cypress having less than 20 percent canopy coverage, and a dense ground cover of freshwater marsh plants. Various combinations of pickerel weed, sawgrass, maidencane, arrowhead, fire flag, cattail, spike rush, bulrush, white water lily, water shield, and various sedges dominate freshwater marshes and wet prairies. Many marsh or wet prairie types, such as sawgrass marsh or maidencane prairie, have been described and so-named based on their dominant plant species.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~54.7MB.

Grassland
These are upland communities where the predominant vegetative cover is very low growing grasses and forbs. This very early successional category includes all sites with herbaceous vegetation during the time period between bare ground, and the shrub and brush stage. It also includes areas that may be maintained in this stage through periodic mowing, such as along dikes or levees.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2.9MB.

Improved Pasture Land
This GIS data set represents the improved pasture habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~20MB.

Unimproved Woodland Pasture
This GIS data set represents the unimproved/woodland pasture habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~4MB.

Salt Marsh
This GIS data set represents Florida's salt marsh areas. These data are intended as a general reference map only.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~23.2MB.
Download the Atlantic Areas zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.
Download the South Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~7MB.
Download the Southwest Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.
Download the Big Bend zipped KML Google Earth file ~11MB.
Download the Panhandle zipped KML Google Earth file ~3MB.

Sawgrass Marsh
Freshwater marshes dominated by sawgrass.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~9.49MB.


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Scrub


Sand Scrub Pine
Sand pine scrub occurs on extremely well drained, sorted, sterile sands deposited along former shorelines and islands of ancient seas. This xeric plant community is dominated by an overstory of sand pine and has an understory of myrtle oak, Chapman's oak, sand-live oak, and scrub holly. Ground cover is usually sparse to absent, especially in mature stands, and rosemary and lichens occur in some open areas. Sites within the Ocala National Forest that have an overstory of direct seeded sand pine, and an intact understory of characteristic xeric scrub oaks, are also included in this category. Fire is an important ecological management tool, and commonly results in even-aged stands within regenerated sites. The distribution of this community type is almost entirely restricted to within the state of Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2.9MB.

Xeric Scrub Oak
Xeric oak scrub is a xeric hardwood community typically consisting of clumped patches of low growing oaks interspersed with bare areas of white sand. This community occurs on areas of deep, well-washed, sterile sands, and it is the same understory complex of scrubby oaks and other ground cover species that occurs in the sand pine scrub community. This condition frequently occurs when the short time periods between severe fires results in the complete removal of sand pine as an overstory species. Also included in this category are sites within the Ocala National Forest which have been clear-cut, and are sometimes dominated during the first one to five years by the xeric oak scrub association. The xeric oak scrub community is dominated by myrtle oak, Chapman's oak, sand-live oak, scrub holly, scrub plum, scrub hickory, rosemary, and saw palmetto. Fire is important in setting back plant succession and maintaining viable oak scrubs

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~3.9MB.


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Swamp


Bay Swamp
These hardwood swamps contain broadleaf evergreen trees that occur in shallow, stagnant drainages or depressions often found within pine flatwoods, or at the base of sandy ridges where seepage maintains constantly wet soils. The soils, which are usually covered by an abundant layer of leaf litter, are mostly acidic peat or muck that remains saturated for long periods but over which little water level fluctuation occurs. Overstory trees within bayheads are dominated by sweetbay, swamp bay, and loblolly bay. Depending on the location within the state, other species including pond pine, slash pine, blackgum, cypress, and Atlantic white cedar can occur as scattered individuals, but bay trees dominate the canopy and characterize the community. Understory and gound cover species may include dahoon holly, wax myrtle, fetterbush, greenbriar, royal fern, cinnamon fern, and sphagnum moss.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~8.8MB.

Cypress Swamp
Cypress swamps are regularly inundated wetlands form a forested border along large rivers, creeks, and lakes, or occur in depressions as circular domes or linear strands. These communities are strongly dominated by either bald cypress or pond cypress, with very low numbers of scattered black gum, red maple, and sweetbay. Understory and ground cover are usually sparse due to frequent flooding but sometimes include such species as buttonbush, lizard's-tail, and various ferns.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~52.3MB.

Hardwood Swamp
These wooded wetland communities are composed of either pure stands of hardwoods, or occur as a mixture of hardwoods and cypress where hardwoods achieve dominance. This association of wetland-adapted trees occurs throughout the state on organic soils and forms the forested floodplains of non-alluvial rivers, creeks, and broad lake basins. Tree species include a mixed overstory containing black gum, water tupelo, bald cypress, dahoon holly, red maple, swamp ash, cabbage palm, and sweetbay.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~52.2MB.

Mangrove Swamp
This GIS data set represents the mangrove swamp habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~5MB.

Shrub Swamp
Shrub swamps are wetland communities dominated by dense, low-growing, woody shrubs or small trees. Shrub swamps are usually characteristic of wetland areas that are experiencing environmental change, and are early to mid-successional in species complement and structure. These changes are a result of natural or man-induced perturbations due to increased or decreased hydroperiod, fire, clear cutting or land clearing, and siltation. Shrub swamps statewide may be dominated by one species, such as willow, or an array of opportunistic plants may form a dense, low canopy. Common species include willow, wax myrtle, primrose willow, buttonbush, and saplings of red maple, sweetbay, black gum, and other hydric tree species indicative of wooded wetlands. In northern Florida, some shrub swamps are a fire-maintained subclimax of bay swamps. These dense shrubby areas are dominated by black titi, swamp cyrilla, fetterbush, sweet pepperbush, doghobble, large gallberry, and myrtle-leaf holly.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~52.3MB.


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Urban or Developed


Extractive
These areas encompass surface and subsurface mining operations. Areas included are sand, gravel and clay pits, phosphate mines, and limestone quarries. Industrial complexes were the extracted material is refined, packaged or further processed may also be included in this category.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1.7MB.

High Impact - Urban
Unvegetated areas such as roads, residential and commercial buildings, parking lots, etc.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~54.3MB.

Low Impact - Urban
Disturbed areas within urbanized areas that may or may not be vegetated. Examples of land uses included in this category are lawns, golf courses, road shoulders, grassy areas surrounding places such as airports, park facilities, etc. Many secondary roads, such as forest roads, are included in this category.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~49.9MB.


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Uncategorized Terrestrial Landcover


Cabbage Palm - Live Oak Hammock
This plant community is characterized by cabbage palms and live oaks occurring in small clumps within prairie communities. These hammocks typically have an open understory which may include such species as wax myrtle, water oak, and saw palmetto. Cabbage palm-live oak hammocks are often found bordering large lakes and rivers, and are distributed throughout the prairie region of south central Florida and extend northward in the St. John's River basin. Cabbage palms often form a fringe around hardwood islands located within improved pastures.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~477KB.

Cypress-Pine-Cabbage Palms
This community includes cypress, pine and/or cabbage palm in combinations in which none of the species achieves dominance. This assemblage forms a transition between moist upland and hydric sites.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~3.78MB.

Hydric Hammocks
Hydric hammocks occur on soils that are poorly drained or have high water tables. This association is a still-water wetland, flooded less frequently and for shorter periods of time than mixed hardwood and cypress swamps. Outcrops of limestone are common in the gulf coastal area. Typical plant species include laurel oak, live oak, cabbage palm, southern red cedar, and sweetgum. Canopy closure is typically 75-90%. The sub-canopy layer and ground layer vegetation is highly variable between sites. Wax myrtle is the most frequent shrub in hydric hammock. Other shrubs include yaupon, dahoon, and swamp dogwood. Ground cover may be absent or consist of a dense growth of ferns, sedges, grasses, and greenbriars. Sites are usually between mesic hammocks or pine flatwoods and river swamp, wet prairie, or marsh. This hammock type is found in a narrow band along parts of the Gulf coast and along the St. Johns river where they often extend to the edge of coastal salt marshes.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~623KB.

Sandhill
Sandhill communities occur in areas of rolling terrain on deep, well-drained, white to yellow, sterile sands. This xeric community is dominated by an overstory of scattered longleaf pine, along with an understory of turkey oak and bluejack oak. The park-like ground cover consists of various grasses and herbs, including wiregrass, partridge pea, beggars tick, milk pea, queen's delight, and others. Fire is an important factor in controlling hardwood competition and other aspects of sandhill ecology. Although many of these sites throughout the state have been modified through the selective or severe cutting of longleaf pine, these areas are still included in the sandhill category.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~9.5MB.

Scrub Mangrove
This GIS data set represents the scrub mangrove habitat type reselected from the fl_veg03 data set (2003). In 1990, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) completed a project to map Florida vegetation and land cover using 1985-89 Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. The resulting digital database contained 17 natural and semi-natural land cover types, 4 land cover types indicative of human disturbance, and 1 water class. By 2003 (the year of the imagery used in this project), the earlier data set (comprised mostly of 1986-87 imagery) was about 16-17 years old, and could no longer be considered current. Not only was the earlier vegetation and land cover data set becoming out of date, but so were the wildlife and strategic habitat models that were based on that data. In order to keep our vegetation, land cover, and wildlife habitat models current, FWC staff realized the need to develop a new, updated vegetation and land cover map for Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB.

Tropical Hardwood Hammock
These upland hardwood forests occur in extreme south Florida and are characterized by tree and shrub species on the northern edge of a range that extends southward into the Caribbean. These communities are sparsely distributed along coastal uplands south of a line from about Vero Beach on the Atlantic coast to Sarasota on the Gulf coast. They occur on many tree islands in the Everglades and on uplands throughout the Florida Keys. This cold-intolerant tropical community has very high plant species diversity, sometimes containing over 35 species of trees and about 65 species of shrubs. Characteristic tropical plants include strangler fig, gumbo-limbo, mastic, bustic, lancewood, ironwoods, poisonwood, pigeon plum, Jamaica dogwood, and Bahama lysiloma. Live oak and cabbage palm are also sometimes found within this community. Tropical hammocks in the Florida Keys may also contain several plants, including lignum vitae, mahogany, thatch palms, and manchineel, which are extremely rare within the United States.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~178KB.


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Freshwater Aquatic

Lake Vegetation


Lake Vegetation - Central Florida
This dataset serves as documentation of vegetation in the littoral zone within Alligator Lake, Coon Lake, Cypress Lake, East Lake Tohopekaliga, Lake Center, lake Gentry, Lake Hart, Lake Hatchineha, Lake Istokpoga, Lake Kissimmee, Lake Lizzie, Lake Marion, Lake Mary Jane, Lake Tohopekaliga, Lochloosa Lake, Newnans Lake, Orange Lake, Tiger Lake, and Trout Lake in Alachua, Highlands, Orange, Osceola, and Polk counties, Florida using digital aerial photography. These Vegetation communities data were compiled using most recent data for each available lake at the time of compilation.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~52MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~?MB.


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Rivers, Streams, and Lakes


Springs - FL
This dataset reflects the Spring and Spring Run habitat identified for the Fish and Wildlife Legacy Initiative - Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (FWLI-CWCS). It contains all springs originating from the Floridan aquifer.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~99KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Streams
This GIS data set represents NHDFlowline in Florida - The core linear network of the surface-water drainage system primarily consisting of streams, and artificial paths through polygons. The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) is a feature-based database that interconnects and uniquely identifies the stream segments or reaches that make up the nation's surface water drainage system. NHD data was originally developed at 1:100,000-scale and exists at that scale for the whole country. This high-resolution NHD, generally developed at 1:24,000/1:12,000 scale, adds detail to the original 1:100,000-scale NHD. (Data for Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands was developed at high-resolution, not 1:100,000 scale.)

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~70MB.

NHD Sub-Basins - Florida
This GIS data set represents National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) Subbasins. Subbasins are subdivisions of the basins. Subbasins are the fourth level (8 digit) of the hydrologic unit hierarchy, formerly called "cataloging units". This file contains Hydrologic Unit boundaries and codes for the Florida. The NHD data set is a seamless National representation of Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) boundaries at HUC2 to HUC12 levels compiled from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and U.S. Department of Agricultural (USDA) National Resources Conservation Services (NRCS) Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) sources.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~9MB.

Florida Lakes *
This GIS data set represents FDEP's statewide lakes coverage rectified to the DOQQs. Lakes data will likely be updated in the future to include FDEP-developed waterbody IDs for each lake. Also, USGS GNIS naming board will be given the chance to check and approve the determined lake names. If/as this effort is accomplished, GNIS IDs may be added to the attribute data by FDEP. Check with FDEP for the most recent updates.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~7MB.


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Base Layers


Boundaries


Eco-Regions
Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type,quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

City Limits as of 2010
This GIS data set represents city boundaries information based on 2000 Census TIGER file entities. The extent is the entire state of Florida. Places reported in the decennial census data include census-designated places, consolidated cities, and incorporated places.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~3MB.

Districts - US Congress
The 112th Congressional District Boundaries data set contains geographic information for the political entities in Florida of the 112th Congressional districts. This is an update to the usdist_2009 layer.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Districts - State Senate
This dataset contains the boundaries for the State of Florida Senate Voting Districts, as redrawn by the Florida Legislature in 2002. This layer is an update of the previous version in FGDL and consists only of attribute updates. Linework for districts changes every 10 years based on the census. Senators listed are for the 2009 regular session.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~1MB.

Districts - State House
This dataset contains the boundaries for the State of Florida House Voting Districts, as redrawn by the Florida Legislature in 2002. This layer is an update of the previous version in FGDL and consists only of attribute updates. Linework for districts changes every 10 years based on the census. House members listed are for the regular session 2009.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~2MB.

FWC Regional Boundaries
This GIS data set shows the FWC regions with a generalized shoreline.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1.5MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~1.5MB.

Florida Water Management Districts
This is a Florida GIS data set containing the boundaries of the five water management districts, reflecting the boundary change effective July 1, 2003. FMRI obtained these data from the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD.) Although only the region polygon shapefile is served on the ArcIMS site, an arc version is also available. The arcs have been coded so that they may be drawn with or without the coastline. This data set is intended for cartographic purposes only.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~300KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~357KB.


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Facilities and Transportation


Boat Ramps - Freshwater
Shows the locations of freshwater boat ramps managed by the FWC in Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

FWC Facilities
This GIS layer consists of points representing facilities of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, including the Main Headquarters, Regional Offices, Division of Wildlife, Freshwater Fisheries, and Fish and Wildlife Research Institute.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Placenames
This GIS data set represents the geographic names of places in the state of Florida. FWRI staff downloaded this data set as a delimited text file from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Geographic Names Information System (GNIS).The GNIS is developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN), and it contains information about physical and cultural geographic features in the United States and associated areas, both current and historical, but not including roads and highways.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~4MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~5MB.

Railroads
The Rail Network is a comprehensive database ofthe railway system of the United States at the1:100,000 scale. The data set covers the 48 contiguous States plus the District of Columbia. This particular set covers the state of Florida.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Roads - Interstate
The Interstates feature class covers the state of Florida at a scale of 1:24,000 with a projection system of Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) 17 North zone and a horizontal datum of North American 1983 (NAD 1983). The map units are in meters.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB.

Wildlife Crossings - FL
This dataset contains the midpoint of roadway facilities that cross under or over a wildlife passage. This data is taken from the October 2013 version of the Florida Department of Transportation Roads Characteristics inventory (RCI) dataset.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~11KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~8KB.


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Managed Areas


Florida Managed Areas
This is a polygon data layer for public (and some private) lands that the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) has identified as having natural resource value and that are being managed at least partially for conservation purposes. The term "Managed Area" refers to a managed conservation land.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~18MB.
Download the NE Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.
Download the NC Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~10MB.
Download the NW Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~4MB.
Download the SW Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~6MB.
Download the So Florida zipped KML Google Earth file ~4MB.

Critical Wildlife Areas
(1) Critical wildlife areas may be established by the Commission with prior concurrence in such designation by the owner of the property wherein the area is situated. All areas shall be described in the order with sufficient specificity as to permit identification and shall be posted by the Commission so as to provide due notice as to the identity and status of the area. The order establishing the critical wildlife area shall contain the dates during which the tract shall be accorded maximum protection from human or vehicular disturbance. (2) No person shall take or disturb any wildlife within any critical wildlife area during the period designated by the order establishing such area. No person shall enter or operate a vehicle within any critical wildlife area during any period in which public access is prohibited by the order establishing such area. No person shall knowingly allow a dog under their care to enter or remain upon a critical wildlife area during any period in which public access is prohibited by the order establishing such area.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~9KB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Marine Protected Areas
The MPA Inventory is a comprehensive catalog that provides detailed information for existing marine protected areas in the United States. The inventory provides geospatial boundary information (in polygon format) and classification attributes that seek to define the conservation objectives, protection level, governance and related management criteria for all sites in the database.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~66MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Fish Management Areas
This GIS data set represents boundaries of Fish Management Areas (FMA) administered by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). These data are intended as a general reference map only. More information on activities permitted in individual areas can be found on the FWC Division of Freshwater Fisheries Web site: http://floridafisheries.com/fma/index.html.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile <1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file <1MB.

Florida Wildlife Management Areas
This GIS data set represents the 2009-2010 Wildlife Management Areas administered by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), and other associated public use areas. These data are intended as a general reference map only. More information on activities permitted in individual areas can be found from the links on FWC's Web site.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~1MB. Download the zipped KML Google Earth file ~1.2MB.


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Counties


Florida Counties(1:24,000)
This GIS data set contains Florida county boundaries found on the most recent 7.5-minute USGS (1:24000 scale) quadrangles available in 1997. The county borders extend to the state water line. The linework along the state borders with Alabama and Georgia exactly matches FWRI's 1:40K shoreline.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~2MB.

Southeast US Counties(1:100,000)
This GIS data set represents the counties of the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic ocean, from Delaware to Texas. This data set also includes a general shoreline of eastern Mexico.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~16MB.


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Shorelines


Florida Shoreline(1:12,000) - detailed
Florida's shoreline was heads-up digitized using ARC Map software and color aerial photography downloaded from Labins.org as DOQQs (which were taken/captured in the beginning and throughout the 2004 year depending on the Water Management District and have approximately 1:12,000 scale accuracy). Included is all of Florida's coast, inner-coastal (Bays, Harbors, etc.), coastal rivers (Approximately 10 miles on average or to the end of the river traced), coastal canals, coastal lakes connected to the ocean and all of Lake Okeechobee and the St. Johns River.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~22MB.

Florida Shoreline(1:40,000) - intermediate
This GIS data set represents the Florida shoreline as polygons and lines. Initially digitized in 1990 by USFWS under FWRI contract, the data set was created from the most current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Nautical Charts available at the time. The scale of the source charts varied from 1:10,000 in some harbors to 1:80,000 in the Big Bend area. However, most of the source scale is 1:40,000.

View the full Metadata report. Download the zipped shapefile ~18MB.


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